Change Units of Y-Axis Scale

This seems like it should be something so easy to do, and I am hoping it is just something obvious I am missing...

 

I have a bar chart showing the number of Employee Accidents our company has had, broken down by division. Currently, the y-axis scale is defaulted to count by 0.5, but that does not really make sense given the content of the graph since you would never have 0.5 an accident. I want to y-axis scale to count by 1's or even 2's, but I cannot figure out how to manually set the unit the scale counts by. I have tried editing the Max for the scale to be 12 (instead of 12.5 as it is currently), hoping that the scale would then adjust, but it keeps the scale's max at 12.5 regardless.

 

See attached file for how the graph looks.

 

Any help or advice would be much appreciated!

 

Thanks!

Best Answer

  • AS
    AS 🔵
    Accepted Answer

    Just keep tinkering with those settings until you get something you like.  Go higher on the max, maybe, maybe 14 or 15 or 16.

    Using the Max Gridlines should help, too.  

    There is less flexibility here compared to Excel, for example, but you can usually get it the way you like.  Watch out for future high outliers, though.  They may end up going above the scale you've set and won't show as taller if they're past your Max value.

Answers

  • Thanks @AS, I will try that -- seems crazy that this feature isn't in Domo. I can't imagine I am the only person who has ever wanted to change the unit a scale counts by, if nothing else for easier readability.

     

  • You're right.  To put it in context, Domo as a company wants to provide enough Domo product customization that clients can be really productive and find something to suit their needs, but not so much customization that they can change to the nth level of detail and make something that, juxtaposed against the greater context, is ugly or is inconsistent with the whole reporting environment.  There is a constant fine-tuning and balancing of individual vs system needs, and this is one example.  Another example is the variety of color in the color palette.  There's just enough color to provide some variety but not so much that you can make things really hideous, like Excel.  Nobody lauds Excel for its simplicity and beauty or ease of use.  But that's exactly what Domo wants people to think of its product.  Domo still wants to control that brand whereas Microsoft doesn't care, or has decided that power users matter more than regular business users.  You'll see the shadows of this brand strategy pop up on the regular.

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